Call Number: VAULT Case oversize YS 01 
Author: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616.
Uniform Title:Plays
Title: Mr. William Shakespeares comedies, histories & tragedies : published according to the true originall copies.
Published: London : Printed by Isaac Iaggard and Ed. Blount, 1623.
Physical Description: [9] ℓ, 303, 100 (i.e. 98), [2], 69-232, [1], 78-80, [25], 98, 109-156, 257-993 [i.e. 339]p. port. 32 cm.
Subject (LCSH): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 --Bibliography --Folios. 1623.
Other Name: Heming, john, d.1630, ed.
Condell, Henry, d. 1627, ed.
Notes:The First Folio edition.

Newberry Library’s Shakespeare Exhibit

Playbill, December 2016 —  As the world marked the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, Chicago had good reason to boast. Even though it’s an ocean and half a continent away from Shakespeare’s home turf in England, the city hosted the largest celebration of the Bard in 2016.

“There’s really nothing that matches Shakespeare 400 Chicago,” says Jill Gage, referring to the year-long series of events that took place at Chicago Shakespeare Theater on Navy Pier and other venues around town. As that festival wraps up in December, Gage has curated an exhibit at the Newberry Library called Creating Shakespeare. Inside two galleries flanking the research library’s entrance, glass cases offer glimpses of rare books—including the Newberry’s very own copy of the First Folio, a massive tome that collected all of Shakespeare’s plays in 1623, seven years after his death. Just seeing Shakespeare’s words printed in black ink on that yellowed, centuries-old paper is an eye-opening experience.

Read the rest of the article at Playbill.

Photo: Newberry Library

electionnight

Election Night 2016

Letter from Chicago: Misery engulfed Clinton supporters as outcome became clear

London Evening Standard, November 9, 2016 — In this overwhelmingly Democratic city, many of the people who’d gathered in downtown bars to watch election results grew sullen and angry as the night went on. “How is it close?” asked Rachael Smith, a DePaul University student wearing a T-shirt labeled “The Future is Female,” as she watched the TVs in the historic Miller’s Pub in the Loop. Read the rest of the article at the London Evening Standard.

abajournal-thissong

Lawsuits aim to put iconic folk songs back in the public domain

ABA Journal, November 2016 — As he hitchhiked around the country in 1940, Woody Guthrie got sick of hearing Irving Berlin’s patriotic hit “God Bless America” on car radios and jukeboxes. So the itinerant folk singer penned his own anthem in response—with lyrics that challenged the concept of private property. He called the song “This Land.” Five years later, Guthrie included the lyrics in a booklet of 10 songs he’d written. He printed copies and put a 25-cent price on the cover—along with “Copyright 1945 W. Guthrie.”

That same decade, striking tobacco workers in Charleston, South Carolina, lifted their voices to an old African-American spiritual, vowing that they’d triumph: “We Will Overcome.” Or did they sing “We Shall Overcome”? At some point, someone tweaked the lyrics, which had been evolving for decades. The word will became shall, and the phrase down in my heart changed to deep in my heart.

Those new words were on the page when Ludlow Music applied for a copyright in 1960, crediting Zilphia Horton, Frank Hamilton and Guy Carawan—not as authors of the original song but as the people who’d written new verses and a new arrangement. The company filed for another copyright in 1963, adding more verses and another name: Pete Seeger. But were these people responsible for the words in the most famous verse? Or do those words belong to the public? Read the rest of the article at the ABA Journal.

curiouscity-ike

Displaced: When the Eisenhower Expressway Moved in, Who Was Forced Out?

WBEZ’s Curious City, August 26, 2016 — My story answers the question: “What happened to the people displaced by the Eisenhower Expressway?” Read and explore the interactive story (with web design by Logan Jaffe) and listen to the podcast and radio version.